A Texturilicious Cardigan

I guess it was too much to hope that I’d complete this project last year, but it’s finally ready. Well, almost ready, since I feel the sweater could do with more buttons but we’ve not ordered any. However, it’s wearable now, so can I consider it done already? πŸ™‚

A Texturilicious Cardigan

A Texturilicious Cardigan

The cardigan used up almost 1400 metres of yarn, so it was a lot of knitting, and it’s pretty heavy as well. The sleeves turned out much looser than intended, because I apparently messed up copying over the measurements for my calculations! ‘Oops’ is an understatement. 😦 It’s super-cosy, however, which meets the main requirement for the sweater. πŸ˜› I like that the i-cord edges suit the cardigan well. Hope my sis finds a use for it in the few remaining weeks of cold weather.

The knitting seemed to have gone on forever, but the slipped rib + seed stitch texture of the body was really fun to knit, and needless to say, I love that texture! Here’s the pattern I used for it:

RS: sl1p wyib, k1, p1, k1, p1
WS: p1, k1, p1, sl1p wyif, p1

A Texturilicious Cardigan

What next?

Seeing Ginny’s stitching updates throughout last year, I’d been thinking of refreshing my cross stitch skills, and I’ve joined the Linen and Threads SAL this year. It’s awesome how supportive the community is on their Facebook group!

Knitting-wise, I’ve decided that my next projects are a pullover for myself, and another blouse for my mom. Let the designing begin! πŸ™‚

(I’ve totally given up on crochet, haven’t I? Hope I find something to crochet this year.)

I know I’m a slow knitter / stitcher, and yet I found myself slightly stressing sometime last year about the ‘insufficient’ number of things I was making. (Not limited only to knitting.) So I’ve decided that my new mantra is to be mindful, and I don’t mind if my throughput becomes smaller than it already is. As long as I love the process of working on my projects (and maybe get to learn a new technique or two along the way), everything is good.

And how about you? I’d love to know your new craftsy goals, and your progress on old ones.


A Texturilicious Start!

After a successful stripey top, it’s time for a new project! The project on my needles right now is a cardigan for my sis that I started this week.

Earlier, I mentioned a delicious orange yarn that we thought of working with, but I couldn’t really come up with something that would do justice to the yarn, so we put it aside. And, ahem, we bought some new yarn for her cardigan. πŸ˜€ This is Nako Pirlanta, the same yarn that I used for a shawl for my sis, so I guess she likes this one!

Texturilicious Cardigan

The color this time is Almond, though it doesn’t remind me of any almond I’ve seen. πŸ˜› It’s still a gorgeous color, though. I’ve abandoned the vertical stripes plan for this project, and have gone with a lot of dense textures instead. The cardigan is raglan style, with simple eyelet-infused cables running along the raglan. The sleeves are seed stitch, and the body comprises of seed stitches and slipped-stitch ribs. I think I’ll have a better picture to put up when I make actual progress on it. πŸ™‚

This is supposed to be a winter project, and I’m knitting it combination style to see if I notice an increase in my speed. Even so, I’m not sure how fast I can knit it so it’s ready to wear this winter — even late winter. I’ll just do my best!

Textured Blouse

Can you believe it, my mom’s blouse is ready! I think this is the quickest I’ve ever produced a garment. πŸ™‚

While the knit itself was pretty boring because (a) simple pattern and (b) this project occupied every free moment I had, I’m satisfied with how it turned out. The texture is just awesome!

Seed Stitch Textured Blouse

I used a slipped seed stitch variation for the body and sleeves, and garter stitch for all the borders. The slipped stitches give some denseness to the fabric, and I think that works well for the frogged yarn. The yarn obviously doesn’t feel the same as before, but it’s still soft and maintains a slight sheen, so that’s good.

The original seed stitch pattern is worked on the wrong side to avoid purling, but I changed it to right side since I was trying out combination knitting anyway. (I think I like combination knitting. I’ll probably use that in my next project as well.) So my 4-row pattern repeat is:

  1. [p1, sl1 wyib] to end of row. (RS)
  2. Purl.
  3. [sl1 wyib, p1] to end of row.
  4. Purl.

At the raglan seam, I used a (k1, p1, k1) on the RS and purls on the WS.

My mom has already worn it, and this time, I can tell she really likes it. Phew! (And hurrah! πŸ™‚ ) As for the design, however, I think the neck, again, needs to be even smaller for her next blouse — a tighter crew-neck, that is.

Seed Stitch Textured Blouse

I need a short break from the incessant knitting, and then, it’s time to finish those sleeves for my top!

Some Progress, and a Restart

The Progress — Through Thick and Thin

I completed the front of my stripey top, and joined the two pieces too. So technically, it’s now wearable. πŸ˜‰ I can’t wait to complete the sleeves so I can actually wear it.

Through Thick and Thin - body

This is the easiest project ever when it comes to seaming the sides. No pins, no markers required — just align the stripes from the two pieces while seaming, and voila, before you know it, there’s an almost seamless-looking join! πŸ˜€

But… However well this project is going, I’m going to put it aside for a while so I can redo another project.

The Restart — A Textured Blouse

Remember the wavy cabled cardigan that I knit for my mom? Though she was happy with it, quite a few things differed from her expectations, apparently. Throughout the project, I’d made adjustments here and there to fit her not-always-clear requirements, but her final list now comprises a smaller neck and a shorter body. Sigh! It’s so not fun seeing her in a sweater that doesn’t quite fit her needs. So I offered to redo it — with the same yarn, since she likes the feel and color of it.

This time, however, I’m knitting a raglan-style top-down blouse so (a) there’s less fiddling around with pieces, and smaller chance of playing yarn chicken, and (b) my mom can evaluate the size of the neck and the length of the body as early as possible. Also, I’m not using the earlier wavy pattern — it takes ages to work the frequently occurring tiny cables. I made some swatches of other stitches and patterns, and my mom liked a variation of the slip stitch. The stitch does look different here because of the gauge and the top-down knit; but my mom considers it suitable for her blouse. (I hope she doesn’t change her mind about it later.)

Slip/Seed Stitch Squared Blouse

I’ll work exclusively on this project until it’s done. It’s already cold here due to incessant rains, and winter is coming not far behind; it’d be so gratifying if my mom gets to use this blouse for the purpose she’d intended — to get through chilly mornings without wearing a full-fledged sweater.

Oh, by the way, I’ve been knitting continental, but with this project, I’m trying out combination knitting! It’s keeping me on my toes, and I like it so far. It reminds me of the time I learned to knit — I used to purl the ‘wrong’ way, and it was indeed wrong, because I would end up twisting those stitches and wondering why the row was so tight. πŸ™‚

My Fair Cardi

Yes! I do love how this cardigan turned out. Black outfit, wavy eyelets and little buttons — what’s not to like? πŸ˜‰

My Fair Cardi - back

And I think it’s awesome how the simple Old Shale pattern makes for this wavy, beautiful look. I’ve always liked this pattern (though I used to call it Feather and Fan pattern, like a lot of people do) and now, I like it more. πŸ™‚ I’d wanted to incorporate Old Shale into a different project before I started working on this one. I still want to use it in the other project, maybe I’ll think of a different way.

My Fair Cardi - Old Shale pattern

Back to this project, though. When I think raglan, I always think top-to-bottom construction, but in this bottom-to-top project, it was easier to fix the holes that invariably form at the armhole — the ones at the joins / splits of body and sleeves. The fixer stitches always look weird to me in top-to-bottom sweaters, and they were much better here. Or maybe it’s because it’s black. πŸ˜‰ I should try a bottom-to-top project with a lighter color to see if this experience repeats.

Overall, the general fit, the edgings, and the buttonholes all turned out fine, but as with all my projects, there’s always that something that doesn’t exactly match the expectations of the intended recipient. πŸ™‚ In this case, it’s the neck, which turned out larger than what my sister was hoping for.

If she didn’t want the sweater, I’d be too happy to snatch it away from her (though it won’t fit me exactly the same.) But turns out she does want it! 😐

So it’s My Fair Cardi!

My next project is a sweater for my sis. We’d talked about what she’s looking for in it, and she’d said she wanted some eyelets in its bottom half, and a solid top half with some pattern. So naturally, I thought about the Feather and Fan pattern, since my fellow knitting/crochet blogger, Kat, had just talked about her Sage Remedy Top, and I thought the pattern there resembled it.

So I looked up the pattern to refresh my memory, and I found that what I’d always thought of as Feather and Fan pattern is actually the Old Shale pattern! Feather and Fan turns out to be a completely different pattern, and Sarah points out the differences in a recent post.

Sarah’s post also mentions projects that use Old Shale pattern, and I came upon My Fair Cardi. It’s a pretty simple design, and I’d thought of exactly that for the bottom half, so I showed it to my sis. She thought the cardigan looked good as is, with Old Shale in both halves. Even the shape of the neck was to her liking. Alright then, problem solved! I could just use this pattern.

The cardigan is a bottom-up raglan construction, and is knit in pieces — sleeves, front, and back — all the way, and the pieces are joined raglan-style in the very end. Um, when I’m knitting a bottom-up raglan cardigan, I like to knit the body as one piece, knit the sleeves, and join all the pieces at the armhole and knit them together. So that’s a slight deviation from the pattern for me — other than the usual deviations to account for changes in measurements to conform to my (or in this case, my sister’s) preferences.

So I knitted a swatch, and readied my excel worksheet to track my pattern deviations, and started on the project. Since Old Shale is mostly stockinette stitches, it’s knitting up fast, compared to my previous chock-full-of-tiny-cables project. Exciting times! πŸ˜‰

My Fair Cardi progress - sleeve

I’m knitting the sleeve flat, a departure from my previous raglan projects. I think I’m beginning to like the distinct seam it results in when the edges are joined, instead of the faux ‘purl column’ seam that I add when knitting sleeves in the round. (And there’s a picot edge! I like that edge.)

The Phoenix (My do-over pullover)

My pullover has risen again from its own ashes, and is now a beautiful sweater that I’m waiting for colder temperatures to wear! I absolutely adore this pullover! ❀

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

Of course, I did wear it to model it… Phew! The weather’s definitely way too hot for all this stuff. (Look at the glare from the sun seeping through the curtains!) I think I was fidgeting and the picture’s a bit blurry, but it’ll have to do.

The Phoenix pullover

So right now, the pullover’s neatly folded up, and is awaiting a ‘proper’ inauguration. Sleep well until winter, my pretty! πŸ™‚ (Did you know that’s called aestivation? The equivalent of hibernation, only, this happens in summer.)