Waves

It’s finished! πŸ™‚

Waves cardigan / blouse

Waves cardigan / blouse

I did finish the entire cardigan using just the yarn at hand, and didn’t have to resort to threads or other ‘binding’ materials to attach parts to other parts. Victory! There was even yarn available to sew on the buttons! I have a half a meter of yarn left when handing over the finished sweater to my mom.

The cardigan was definitely different than what my mom expected, but that’s the reaction we’ve come to expect of her. πŸ™‚ She wears it early morning when it’s chilly, and she likes that it fits her and looks good on her and keeps her warm. πŸ™‚

The 1×1 cable stitches I used are:

c1b: sl 1 st to CN and hold in back, k1 from LH needle, p1 from CN.
c1f: sl 1 st to CN and hold in front, p1 from LH needle, k1 from CN.

The wavy pattern is a 16-row repeat, with multiples of 4 stitches.

Row 1 (RS): *p2, c1b. Repeat from *.
Row 2 and all even rows: knit the knit sts and purl the purl sts.
Row 3: *p1, c1b, p1. Repeat from *.
Row 5: *c1b, p2. Repeat from *.
Row 7: *k1, p3. Repeat from *.
Row 9: *c1f, p2. Repeat from *.
Row 11: *p1, c1f, p1. Repeat from *.
Row 13: *p2, c1f. Repeat from *.
Row 15: *p3, k1. Repeat from *.

I used seed stitch for the button band. No extra borders at the cuffs or hip, because they were tubular cast on stitches. I used mattress stitch to convert the flat-knitted sleeve to a tube, and used the same mattress stitch principles to attach the sleeve to the body.

Now I’m figuring out a pattern to use in a cardigan for my sis. She wants some eyelets / lace but not too much, and once we’ve decided on a design, it’s gonna be time to knit again. I’m hoping that this project will have better pacing than the one I just finished.

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Cable City!

Finally, finally! My cabled top is ready. πŸ™‚

Cable City! Top

This was the most fun I’ve had with cables till now — never a boring row! I did work on it on and off, though, so that might have been a contributing factor to the not getting bored bit. πŸ˜›

The Nako Saten yarn that I used for this was really fun to knit with. (I’ve bought more skeins to knit something for my mom.) And I totally love the color. ❀ It’s too hot right now to wear this top, but fall or winter would be perfect.

I knit everything top-down. I made the front and back separately, sewed them together, then knit seamless set-in sleeves. I lined all the edges with i-cords.

These are the cable patterns that I used for this top:

Cable City! Top

To look up the pattern names, I referred to my old post which I’d written when I’d made just a little bit of progress on this one, and saw that I’d hoped this top would be epic when done. πŸ™‚ I do think it’s turned out pretty epic (it’s my latest favorite project πŸ˜€ ), and I can’t wait to wear it when I’m out and about! ❀

The Phoenix (My do-over pullover)

My pullover has risen again from its own ashes, and is now a beautiful sweater that I’m waiting for colder temperatures to wear! I absolutely adore this pullover! ❀

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

Of course, I did wear it to model it… Phew! The weather’s definitely way too hot for all this stuff. (Look at the glare from the sun seeping through the curtains!) I think I was fidgeting and the picture’s a bit blurry, but it’ll have to do.

The Phoenix pullover

So right now, the pullover’s neatly folded up, and is awaiting a ‘proper’ inauguration. Sleep well until winter, my pretty! πŸ™‚ (Did you know that’s called aestivation? The equivalent of hibernation, only, this happens in summer.)

Almost a do-over…

I’m almost done with my do-over pullover. And by that, I mean I only have to block it! (Yay!) Hopefully, this weekend will be it, and I can wear it — and write about it here — proudly. πŸ™‚ Oh wait, it’s already getting hotter, and it’ll be summer soon. πŸ˜€ Well, I’ll get to wear it sometime this year anyway…

Almost a Do-over Pullover!

Almost a Do-over Pullover!

I just love the color of the yarn, and the gently weaving cables. ❀ Though the sleeves don’t show here, they each have one cable column in them. (I’m waiting for the blocking to be done so I can click a good picture with them. Right now, they’re kinda folding in on themselves.) But phew, did it take a long time to get here or what!

I was ready for a reduction in my knitting time this year, because I’ve joined Polymer Clay Adventure 2017 and intend to try my hand at all 24 projects over the year. With my newfound interest in claying, and my excitement to build upon things I learn from the course — and of course, researching techniques and tools, and browsing stores for stuff — I’ve gotten pretty behind in my knitting. :-/ Especially since my yarn projects are mostly big items like sweaters, and tops, and shawls, any progress that I make is not very visible at all.

However, I’ve made a conscious decision to not push myself too hard to devote time to everything. Dialing up my crazy-level might actually be interesting, but I don’t have the time to handle crazier-me just yet. If I spend less time knitting, even if it’s only an hour or two every week, so be it. As long I have fun while I’m on it! πŸ˜‰

Blood and Ash top

The two-tone top is done! I used up the entire skien of the gray yarn, right down to a tie-cord accessory πŸ˜‰ at the neck. I still have almost one skein of the red left, though. I’ll have to think of a project for it.

Blood and Ash top

Blood and Ash top

I’d mentioned earlier that I’d made a ribbed raglan for this top, and I continued with stockinette stitches for the body and sleeves. I used tight 1×1 cables for the edgings instead of simple eyelets that I’d thought of before, and it suits the rest of the top, I must say!

Blood and Ash top

I’m happy with the length of the top and the sleeves. (Phew! Glad the gray lasted — in the end, I was knitting from both ends of the skien and alternating between the sleeve rows.) I like the ease in the top as well. The cord at the neck is still too wiggly, but one more stretching treatment will hopefully fix it. The only problem I have is that it’s still super-hot weather here, and I want it to cool down fast so I can wear this one!

Cabled top in progress

I’ve been working on a cabled top for a while, and it’s the other large project I’m working on. (The first one being the do-over pullover.)

Cabled top patterns

This top is heavily cabled, and it’s the first time I’m making something this cable-y. It’s a lot of stitches, and is slow(er) progress because of the amount of stitch twisting involved in each right-side row, but I’m ecstatic about how it’s turning out. The Nako yarn that I’m using settles down well in the stitches, and the cables look presentable as a result. πŸ˜€ I’ll use the same pattern for the back of the top as well as the front, and I might add a few cables to the sleeves as well, so I’m hoping it’ll be epic, haha! πŸ˜‰

I’m using these stitches in this project:

I was constantly switching between this top and the do-over pullover, and now I’m starting on another project — a shawl for my sis — because it’s boring to keep working on only these two. Which one I’ll finish first remains a mystery, even to me…

Do-over pullover progress

The do-over of the old frogged sweater that I’d talked about earlier is coming along nicely. Like I wanted to, I changed the cable pattern for the new version. I’d used a uniformly twisting basic cable earlier — knit a few rows and then make a 3×3 twist on an RS row. This time I’m using a more slowly twisting cable — in every RS row, twist the same 3 stitches to the right by one stitch until the moved stitches reach the end of the cable column, then rinse and repeat by twisting the 3 leftmost stitches to the right again.

Here’s how one of the sleeves looks —

Do-over pullover

Do-over pullover — slowly twisting cable. The ‘edges’ are purl columns with a decorative seed stitch column amongst them.

Cables in the old one —

Frogged sweater

Frogged sweater — regular cable. (No close-ups because the sweater doesn’t exist anymore!)

I also didn’t turn the pattern around on the other sleeve (I did that in the old one), so the sleeves aren’t mirror images of each other. Over the years, I’ve found that I seem to like cabled sleeves better when both of them have the same pattern.