Chill in the Air

This month is definitely colder than last month. There’s a chill in the air that’s not really noticeable when standing in the sun, but slowly seeps into your soul if you’re in the shade. The kind of cold weather that’s too hot for a sweater but perfect for a shawl! πŸ™‚

Chill in the Air shawl -- blocking

I knit this shawl for my sis — it looks like she prefers the rectangular ones. Lots of eyelets in this shawl, and I broke them up into repeating thick and thin sections between blocks of uniformly wide stockinette sections. So it’s not too warm and not too airy — it’s just right. (I’m so reminded of Goldilocks when I think that! πŸ™‚ )

The eyelets form a winding texture between them that I just love!

Chill in the Air shawl

Over some serial episodes, I added quite a few tassels and formed fringes at both ends. I’d love to see them fully frayed over time — and it looks like they’re as eager as I am to get there!

So how do you like the shawl? My sis loves it. πŸ™‚

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Sunburst shawlette

The Ashton shawlette that I knit for my mom was made with some beautiful self-striping yarn. I’d originally bought the yarn to make a sweater for me, but switched to a shawl because my mom loved the colors. After the mom-project, I still had two skeins of the yarn left, so I thought I could knit a shawlette for myself, if not a sweater.

So I took short breaks from my do-over pullover, and tried knitting some stacked triangles using short rows, and…

Sunburst shawlette, everyone!

Sunburst shawlette

Sunburst shawlette

I like that it has stripes as well as some texture, and that stripes and texture don’t compete against each other — they work well together. This is just how I wanted it to turn out. I made the textured part using slipped stitches, like so:

RS: *sl, p1*

WS: *p*

Guess you can tell I’ve been practicing pattern writing… πŸ˜‰ I ended up using some irregular calculations for the triangles in this shawlette, though, so I probably won’t attempt a pattern for this. It would have been a great first pattern to practice with otherwise.

I knit the shawlette with larger gauge needles so it wouldn’t turn out super-warm. I love that it turned out light and reasonably airy after blocking. Perfect for chilly mornings or evenings!

Sunburst shawlette

I used just one skein of the yarn for this shawlette, and I still have one left! Maybe a hat?

Textured shawl inspiration

Textured Shawl

I knit this shawl inspired by the notes jotted down in the Textured Shawl pattern by Orlane Designs. I think this was the first shawl that I ever knit (but it remained on the needles for a long while.) The notes vary the number of pattern rows, whereas I kept it constant, and I introduced two plain stockinette rows after every two pattern rows. Also, my shawl has a seed stitch border.

This shawl made me realize that triangular shawls aren’t my favorite. πŸ™‚ Not because they result in way too many stitches per row as the project progresses — it’s because they grow too long without getting wide enough. I’ve tried the common method of doubling the increases on the edges (i.e. increase every row on edges, but only every right-side row at the center) but I didn’t really like the slightly curved shape that the edge takes on.Β Kristen Hanley Cardozo mentions quite a few methods of shawl-shaping in her Craftsy post, but being the experiment-crazy person that I am, I’ve now started on a shawl that is mostly triangular-shawl-like in its increases, but I’ll work a lot of short rows in so it gets wider without growing long enough to reach my knees. It uses the fingering weight yarn that I mentioned earlier, so it’s going to be a long while before it’s done. Wish me luck! πŸ™‚