Pullover ft. Entrelac – progress

Entrelac strip – done! In order to prevent pesky tangles, I used three balls of yarn – one for the darker entrelac color, and one each with the lighter body color for the triangles along the two sides. (Of course, very little of the light colored yarn got used for the strip.) I’m now knitting the pullover body, and joining it on the go with the entrelac triangles, like so –

Pullover with a Splash of Entrelac - progress

I’m on the fence regarding this one. I like the idea I had for this design, but not the execution.

Firstly, I don’t like that I got the darker blocks to break away by interspersing entrelac blocks of lighter color. I’d have liked the lighter color to remain stockinette stitch. I can accomplish this by knitting the darker ‘breakaway’ rectangles separately, switching to lighter-color stockinette when I’m at the breaking-away point, and joining the breakaway rectangles while decreasing / increasing lighter color at the touch points as required. But that seems like too much crazy work.

Secondly, I’d thought of making the strip go from shoulder to hip, with a square neck for the sweater body. But due to various compatibility issues with sweater width and strip width, I ended up making it more of a V-neck; I had to join the entrelac strip to the body quite a distance away from the shoulder, but still in the neck curve. I don’t like how that looks. I’d like the strip to go higher, or, as a less preferable choice, stop before it reaches the chest.

Thirdly, the joins at the entrelac edges look super-wonky, and I don’t think blocking will help here. I checked out mattress stitch based joins on a small section of an edge, but the join is more prominent there, if anything.

You can see where I’m going with this. (Ribbit!) I already have non-entrelac-based execution ideas swimming in my head. I’ll give it a few more days before I decide what to do with this project. Or maybe a few months, because it’s neither sweater weather nor sweater-knitting weather here – it’s boiling hot. I’d really hate to frog this one – it looked pretty promising – but I’d probably hate it more if I don’t like how it turns out. Wouldn’t you agree?


Linen and Threads SAL 2018

I finished the February section of the Linen and Threads Mystery SAL, and love how it turned out. This section was nowhere as tedious as last month’s, because it has repeating patterns, which means I wasn’t looking at the chart every few stitches. (I still ended up frogging a few stitches here and there though. Has that ever not happened to anyone? ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

L&T SAL - February finish

L&T SAL – February finish. Eagerly waiting for March!

I especially like the texture of the long-armed cross stitch. It feels almost embossed to the touch because of the extra thread from the longer arm.

Long-armed cross stitch - closeup

As for knitting, I couldn’t come up with anything better than design #3 for my entrelac-featuring pullover, and when I drew up a colored picture of how I’d want to ‘break away’ the rectangles, I found I like the entrelac strip better if I incorporate two colors from the start. So I’ve frogged and restarted the strip now, and I hope I’ll have made some progress when I post next.

Linen and Threads SAL 2018

January section of the Linen and Threads SAL is complete! I took some time off the cross-stitch part to make a hem stitch lined, fringed edge, for which I used scrap yarn from my earlier knitting projects. I’m much happier working on the project now, since I don’t run into runaway threads from the edges. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Linen and Threads Mystery SAL - January

The color difference between left and right is due to a shadow. The embroidery thread is evenly colored.

Here’s a closeup of the hem stitch border. Excuse the color difference – I clicked the pictures on different days.

Hem stitch border

Hem stitch border

I’m pretty excited to start on February. I just discovered long-armed cross stitch, and I’m using it for the border of the February section. I’ll obviously post a picture later that shows its fabulous texture. ๐Ÿ™‚

This section is smaller when compared to last month’s, so I’m hoping to catch up. (Not keeping my fingers crossed though, since February is also shorter, making it a bit hectic so far.)

Ideas – Pullover ft. Entrelac

Entrelac is a technique for which I always need a refresher tutorial, but once I relearn its principles, I wonder how I ever forgot. ๐Ÿ™‚

I’d bought two colors of this speckled Nako yarn, from which I plan to make two sweaters that each have one main color and a little bit of the other color. For my first sweater, entrelac came to mind for the secondary color. (I don’t think I can go with entrelac as the primary feature in a sweater — at least not right now. I don’t know what it is exactly, but I just don’t like how it looks.)

I have started on an entrelac strip, but I still don’t have a concrete plan for the design. ๐Ÿ˜€ Here are rough depictions of a few of my ideas:

Entrelac Pullover Ideas

I do like the look of that bottom one…

While I try to refine the design some more, I’ll knit a couple more entrelac sections on that strip! It doesn’t look like the yarn shows the crisscrossing too well, but it looks fine IRL when blocked. (After all, what else can one expect from a picture with the flash on…)

Entrelac Pullover Strip

I don’t get much knitting time these days, though — I’m spending more time on the very enjoyable cross stitch from the Linen and Threads Mystery SAL. I’m close to completing the January section, so I decided to show pictures in my next post.

Linen and Threads SAL 2018

Two weeks of slow and steady progress on the Linen & Threads Mystery SAL has resulted in this —


This project will not really be framed — it’ll end up as a coffee table runner. I’d originally decided on a single color for the entire project, but then I didn’t like the thought of an entire runner in a single color. On fabric up close (vs. far away on a wall, say), my eye, at least, can only differentiate so many details in a single color. So I’ll use different colors for components wherever possible. The green is new thread (my original color of choice), the green+yellow combo is from old threads, and the thread for the flowers is of a different thickness altogether so its texture is slightly different from the rest of the stitching. Talk about variety! ๐Ÿ™‚

I’m getting good cross-stitch practice with this project, and though I’m nowhere near the end of the section for this month, I’m totally enjoying it! When I reach the other end of this section, I’ll work on securing the borders.

A Texturilicious Cardigan

I guess it was too much to hope that I’d complete this project last year, but it’s finally ready. Well, almost ready, since I feel the sweater could do with more buttons but we’ve not ordered any. However, it’s wearable now, so can I consider it done already? ๐Ÿ™‚

A Texturilicious Cardigan

A Texturilicious Cardigan

The cardigan used up almost 1400 metres of yarn, so it was a lot of knitting, and it’s pretty heavy as well. The sleeves turned out much looser than intended, because I apparently messed up copying over the measurements for my calculations! ‘Oops’ is an understatement. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ It’s super-cosy, however, which meets the main requirement for the sweater. ๐Ÿ˜› I like that the i-cord edges suit the cardigan well. Hope my sis finds a use for it in the few remaining weeks of cold weather.

The knitting seemed to have gone on forever, but the slipped rib + seed stitch texture of the body was really fun to knit, and needless to say, I love that texture! Here’s the pattern I used for it:

RS: sl1p wyib, k1, p1, k1, p1
WS: p1, k1, p1, sl1p wyif, p1

A Texturilicious Cardigan

What next?

Seeing Ginny’s stitching updates throughout last year, I’d been thinking of refreshing my cross stitch skills, and I’ve joined the Linen and Threads SAL this year. It’s awesome how supportive the community is on their Facebook group!

Knitting-wise, I’ve decided that my next projects are a pullover for myself, and another blouse for my mom. Let the designing begin! ๐Ÿ™‚

(I’ve totally given up on crochet, haven’t I? Hope I find something to crochet this year.)

I know I’m a slow knitter / stitcher, and yet I found myself slightly stressing sometime last year about the ‘insufficient’ number of things I was making. (Not limited only to knitting.) So I’ve decided that my new mantra is to be mindful, and I don’t mind if my throughput becomes smaller than it already is. As long as I love the process of working on my projects (and maybe get to learn a new technique or two along the way), everything is good.

And how about you? I’d love to know your new craftsy goals, and your progress on old ones.

Ear Warmers for Dad

Oh yes! My dad finally asked me to knit something! (The conversation actually went more like — Dad: “Sooo… there are these things that cover your ears…” Me [jumping out of my chair]: “Yes, I’ll make one for you!!!”)

So I made an ear warmer — a quick knit. I didn’t realize it when I started, but the pattern turned out not so bad-looking on the inside too, so at least my dad doesn’t need to worry about whether he’s wearing it inside out. I didn’t block it since it is to be worn stretched out anyway, and it looks fine then.

Ear Warmer

Ear Warmer

Ear Warmer (inside-out)

Ear Warmer (inside-out)

It turns out Dad doesn’t want the ear warmer for everyday use, it’s more for when he travels, but it’s still something! This is a great end to my knitting year. ๐Ÿ˜‰ (I have a feeling it’s gonna be a long time before he needs anything knit again…)

Hope the new year brings more wonderful knitting / crocheting to you folks. Happy New Year!

And since writing down a pattern for an ear warmer is far less work than one for a sweater ๐Ÿ˜‰ here’s a summary:

The main pattern is a multiple of 12 stitches and 8 rows. My stitch gauge was 21.25 st per 4″/10cm, so I used 108 stitches for a width of around 20″/51cm.

Cast-on 96 stitches using cable cast-on with larger needles. Join in the round. Switch to smaller needles.
Preparatory rows:
Row 1: *k*
Row 2: *p*
Row 3: *k*
Row 4: *p*, while increasing 12 stitches uniformly. Total stitches: 108
Rows 5, 6, 7, 8: *k3, p3, k1, p1, k1, p3*
Main pattern:
Row 9: Same as preparatory row 5
All even rows: Knit the knits, purl the purls
Row 11: *k3, p2, m1r p-wise, p1, cdd, p1, m1l p-wise, p2*
Row 13: *k3, p2, p2tog, m1r, sl1p, m1l, ssp, p2*
(In row 14, treat the sl1p in previous row as a purl stitch.)
Row 15: Same as preparatory row 5
Repeat rows 9-16 until the ear warmer is almost wide enough. (I made only one more repeat.)
Finishing rows:
Rows 1, 2, 3, 4: Same as preparatory row 5
Row 5: *p*
Row 6: *k*, while decreasing 12 stitches uniformly. Total stitches: 96
Row 7: *p*
Row 8: *k*
Bind off using purl stitches with larger needles.