Vintage vest

Vintage vest

Vintage vest

Whenever I see this vest, I think it looks like it’s about 50 years too late in the making ๐Ÿ™‚ but I love it! It’s something that I started quite a while back, and with leftover yarn from not one, not two, but three projects! ๐Ÿ˜ฎ I’m just really happy with how it turned out. ๐Ÿ™‚

At first, I’d picked only the pink and brown yarn, and I wanted the patterned part to be all over the vest, but from my swatches, I knew the yarn I had would not be enough for that. So I picked additional leftover yarn, choosing to only use it for the sides. In a moment of recklessness ๐Ÿ˜› I started bottom-up though there was the chance that I would run out of yarn before I finish the project… [fingers crossed]

I made the front and back pieces separately, and it was fun moving between four balls of yarn for every row — two for the two sides, and two for the stranded pattern. The pattern itself is pretty simple, as you can see.

That I decided on a closed vest made neck shaping easier. I’m improving with neck shaping, but I’m still not there — there’re always bulges at certain points along the neck no matter how carefully I calculate. Not for garments with a closed front; the necks in these come up pretty nice, regardless of what design I shape them in. When it comes to necks in open fronts that are meant to be buttoned up, though, no amount of modifications to my calculations seems to work… [Scream of fury! Then quite a few slow, deep, calming breaths.]ย  I’ve to research and think a bit more the next time I decide on an open, to-be-buttoned-up garment, and try to figure out what’s going wrong.

Anyway, after all that silent screaming, I should really finish what I started talking about — the neck shaping was a simple gently curving one, and obviously, was joined by armhole shaping after a few rows. I worked each side with three balls, one for the side and two for the pattern, and made an extra stitch along the neck — I would pick up this stitch later for the ribbing.

The back was a similar affair, with a shaping of the neck in the final few rows.

I joined the two pieces using grafting at the shoulders and mattress stitch at the sides. I experimented with adding sleeves to make it a top, but I didn’t like how it looked. So decided to keep it a vest / sleeveless top, and added ribbing at the neck and armholes.

My sister said that it’ll go well with a white shirt. (Now when I mention this vest to her, I say “the one that goes with a white shirt.”) I must say I like the combination! ๐Ÿ™‚

Vintage vest

I still have scraps of yarn left from this project, and they will go into a tiny project, or maybe something with crocheted squares.

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Short jacket

Once upon a time, I knew very little about stranded knitting, but I happily went and bought some yarn color combinations — 3 balls of one color, and 1 of another, thinking I’d knit some colorwork sweaters with them. Gah! If only I’d stopped to think, even for two seconds, I’d have realized that stranded knitting takes more yarn, not the same amount of yarn, as an unstranded sweater. (Duh…)

So I had these nice balls of dark and light gray with me, and I’d wanted to knit something for my sis with them. Having already tried out stranded colorwork by then, I’d realized that they will certainly not turn into a full-length sweater. My very-understanding sis said she’s fine even if it turns out shorter than I’d hoped for, so I started knitting with them nevertheless. Of course, I knit in a top-down manner so I’d see my progress and control when I’d stop. And that’s how we make a jacket! ๐Ÿ˜€

Short jacket

The yarn is of a heavier weight, and combined with the stranded colorwork, it has made for a cozy jacket. โค Not too cozy, though, and that’s why it doesn’t close fully and is a one-button jacket. (Kidding. ๐Ÿ˜‰ We liked how it looks and decided to keep it one-button.) The button is from a bunch that we ordered online, and it fits the jacket in a weird way…

Bubblewrap

Yeah, that’s what I’m gonna call the cardigan that I knit for my friend, KG. Did I mention it’s done? ^_^ I gave the cardigan to her this week, and she likes it, hurrah! [Sigh of relief] The colors look nice together, don’t they?

Bubblewrap cardigan

In the past few weeks, I managed to knit quite a bit, spurred on by the fact (or fear? ๐Ÿ™‚ ) that KG’s vacation is fast approaching, and that I’d promised to knit her this sweater for the vacation… I finally cast off this Sunday, blocked the garment and weaved in the ends. KG had no idea how the cardigan would look, and I was hoping it wouldn’t be a shock to her when she finally saw it. This whole secrecy was a first for me too, because I usually make my ‘customers’ (my mom and my sis so far — and of course, yours truly too ๐Ÿ˜‰ ) wear the project-in-progress now and then to check that things are fine, and course-correct if necessary. It was only when my course corrections reduced to almost-zero levels that I decided to knit one for KG. (She’d been pestering me for a while.) Still, I was apprehensive until the very end about how it would fit her and whether she would like it, and it really was a huge relief that it looks okay and more importantly, that she seems happy with it. And I too am happy that my stranded knitting has improved much.

Bubblewrap cardigan

Thanks, KG, for lending me this photo! ๐Ÿ™‚

Now that this sweater’s done, I’m back on the shawl that I started for my mom, and it’s coming along nicely. I’m following the Ashton shawlette pattern — this pattern has a few types of lace designs, and it’s helped me understand the workings of lace a bit more. Alright! The next pattern I come up with will be a lacy pattern! ๐Ÿ˜› (And I made a stitch marker for this project! I made quite a few of them actually, and I’ll talk about them in my jewelry blog soon, but here’s this marker hard at work. ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

Ashton shawlette with Stitch marker

The next step for me is writing a pattern. I’ve been thinking and talking about it, but haven’t really done anything on it that I can call progress. I’ve seen a lot of patterns by now, and I’m pretty sure I can come up with one.

Tiny triangles top

Hurrah! The top with triangles is officially done; I just finished weaving in the ends a few days ago. I’d kept thinking of this as my first multicolor project, but I realized when I saw an old, old tote bag that I’d knit — that was my first multicolor, stranded-knitting project. Of course, I didn’t know much about knitting then, let alone stranded knitting, and my now-‘experienced’ eyes see a few mistakes, but it’s still a beautiful bag, and kudos to younger me for experimenting so successfully. ๐Ÿ™‚

But I digress. That tote bag deserves a post of its own. (Add to things-to-post-about list — check.) Back to the tiny triangles top. Just in case you’re wondering — it’s the triangles that are tiny, not the top. Here’s a picture to prove that it’s human-sized.

Tiny triangles top

Tiny triangles top

Things looked fine while I knit the front and back pieces. I sewed them together using grafting at the shoulders and mattress stitch at the sides. Then, after repeated failed attempts with different bottom edgings,ย I realized that the edging just won’t sit well with this yarn, even if I made it longer. So I’ve just let the current short 1×1 rib be. It folds up but looks okay(ish), and I can always tuck it in.ย The compromises one makes, huh… And nope, the yarn doesn’t play well with blocking either. ๐Ÿ˜€

I still have a lot of the yarn left. I can’t think of any knitting or crochet project I’d want to use it for, since I don’t wear lacy stuff much (nor does my immediate family), and it’s too much work to make a non-lacy project with this thin yarn. So I’m making a different needlework project — a cross stitch one — from it. I still feel bad for the yarn that it’s not gonna turn into a clothing item. Any ideas for a quick-but-not-lacy project?