Do-over pullover progress

The do-over of the old frogged sweater that I’d talked about earlier is coming along nicely. Like I wanted to, I changed the cable pattern for the new version. I’d used a uniformly twisting basic cable earlier — knit a few rows and then make a 3×3 twist on an RS row. This time I’m using a more slowly twisting cable — in every RS row, twist the same 3 stitches to the right by one stitch until the moved stitches reach the end of the cable column, then rinse and repeat by twisting the 3 leftmost stitches to the right again.

Here’s how one of the sleeves looks —

Do-over pullover

Do-over pullover — slowly twisting cable. The ‘edges’ are purl columns with a decorative seed stitch column amongst them.

Cables in the old one —

Frogged sweater

Frogged sweater — regular cable. (No close-ups because the sweater doesn’t exist anymore!)

I also didn’t turn the pattern around on the other sleeve (I did that in the old one), so the sleeves aren’t mirror images of each other. Over the years, I’ve found that I seem to like cabled sleeves better when both of them have the same pattern.

Textured shawl inspiration

Textured Shawl

I knit this shawl inspired by the notes jotted down in the Textured Shawl pattern by Orlane Designs. I think this was the first shawl that I ever knit (but it remained on the needles for a long while.) The notes vary the number of pattern rows, whereas I kept it constant, and I introduced two plain stockinette rows after every two pattern rows. Also, my shawl has a seed stitch border.

This shawl made me realize that triangular shawls aren’t my favorite. 🙂 Not because they result in way too many stitches per row as the project progresses — it’s because they grow too long without getting wide enough. I’ve tried the common method of doubling the increases on the edges (i.e. increase every row on edges, but only every right-side row at the center) but I didn’t really like the slightly curved shape that the edge takes on. Kristen Hanley Cardozo mentions quite a few methods of shawl-shaping in her Craftsy post, but being the experiment-crazy person that I am, I’ve now started on a shawl that is mostly triangular-shawl-like in its increases, but I’ll work a lot of short rows in so it gets wider without growing long enough to reach my knees. It uses the fingering weight yarn that I mentioned earlier, so it’s going to be a long while before it’s done. Wish me luck! 🙂

Scalene shawl

Yet another post that is delayed due to various reasons, the main one being my laziness. :/ After a bout of creative experimentation for new knitting-related stuff, I’ve just been too bored to follow through on the results. This asymmetric shawl is one of those experiments that was pretty successful as I see it. 🙂

Scalene Shawl
I needed a light shawl for the occasional cool day when a regular shawl would be too unweildy, but not so light that I shiver from the slightest gust. Enter Nako Comfort Stretch sport-weight yarn. Not having worked with elastic / stretchy yarn before, I must admit it was fun getting used to maintaining the correct tension while I knit. Once past that stage, it was a purely pleasant experience working with this yarn. And the results — my stockinette stitches from the yarn are the straightest, cleanest, most beautiful ones I’ve ever made. I’m going to buy more of it soon for a future project!

Scalene Shawl
For this shawl, I’ve used seed stitches for one section, stockinette stitches for another, and an eyelet pattern of my own making for the remaining. For the finishing, I used in-pattern selvedges + garter stitches for two of the edges, and double-crochet along the other. All three edges are of different lengths, and I decided to (unimaginatively) call it the ‘Scalene’ shawl.

And for the first time, I tried the Charting charts that TECHknitter talks about for tracking one’s progress. I’ve never been much into diagrams, and used to make Excel trackers before I saw TECHknitter’s chart-charts; my Excel trackers, it turns out, were too-long versions of chart-charts. I like the alternative, easy-to-track representation provided in chart-charts, especially when it comes to patterns. (And what knitting project doesn’t deal with patterns!) Needless to say, my pattern-heavy projects use chart-charts now!

‘Ribersible’ hat — completed

So I had some free time over the end-of-year holidays, and I managed to complete the reversible ribbed hat, or ‘Ribersible’ hat, that I’d started making for my sister. She seems to be satisfied with it. (Phew! It’s always “(s)he likes it… (s)he likes it not…” when you make something that’s not for yourself…)

When I started knitting it, I had a different version in my head. Along the way, incorporating wishes and tweaks, it became something else altogether. Still good, but something else… 🙂

The horizontal sections in this top-down hat are composed of alternating stripes of 1×2 ribs (which are 2×1 ribs on the other side) and seed stitches (or British moss stitches, as they are also called. There’s an American moss stitch, which is different — but I digress…) I ended it with a 3×3 ribbing using needles one size smaller.

This is how the hat looks inside out and outside in —

'Ribersible' hat

‘Ribersible’ hat

Though there’s no right or wrong side 🙂 my sister and I each have our preference. How about you? Do you like one better than the other?