Textured Blouse

Can you believe it, my mom’s blouse is ready! I think this is the quickest I’ve ever produced a garment. πŸ™‚

While the knit itself was pretty boring because (a) simple pattern and (b) this project occupied every free moment I had, I’m satisfied with how it turned out. The texture is just awesome!

Seed Stitch Textured Blouse

I used a slipped seed stitch variation for the body and sleeves, and garter stitch for all the borders. The slipped stitches give some denseness to the fabric, and I think that works well for the frogged yarn. The yarn obviously doesn’t feel the same as before, but it’s still soft and maintains a slight sheen, so that’s good.

The original seed stitch pattern is worked on the wrong side to avoid purling, but I changed it to right side since I was trying out combination knitting anyway. (I think I like combination knitting. I’ll probably use that in my next project as well.) So my 4-row pattern repeat is:

  1. [p1, sl1 wyib] to end of row. (RS)
  2. Purl.
  3. [sl1 wyib, p1] to end of row.
  4. Purl.

At the raglan seam, I used a (k1, p1, k1) on the RS and purls on the WS.

My mom has already worn it, and this time, I can tell she really likes it. Phew! (And hurrah! πŸ™‚ ) As for the design, however, I think the neck, again, needs to be even smaller for her next blouse — a tighter crew-neck, that is.

Seed Stitch Textured Blouse

I need a short break from the incessant knitting, and then, it’s time to finish those sleeves for my top!

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An earflap hat for my sis

My sis asked me to knit a hat that’s not too tight, covers her ears well and also has functional ties that she can actually tie up. We decided on an earflap hat with ties. I was dying to try out and learn intarsia in the round, so I thought this project would be suitable. I had some amounts of yarn left over from past projects that would work well for some small colorwork detail in a hat, so I decided to use those with the main yarn. I started out with a garter stitch border, and then was ready for some colorwork.

I’d looked for in-the-round intarsia methods from time to time, and hadn’t found many foolproof ways. Tip #1 always seems to be “If possible, just don’t do it.” πŸ™‚ Well I did want to, so these are what I tried:

  • Slip color-2 stitches while working color-1 ones, turn work, then slip color-1 stitches while working color-2 ones. I was pretty hopeful about this method, but it didn’t work for me because it resulted in some overly loose columns just before the first slipped stitch of a color.
  • Flat knitting simulation — Finish the right side, turn work, add an extra ‘reverse’ yarn-over (that is, with left-arm facing me), go through all stitches on the reverse side, work that extra stitch with the last stitch of the row, turn work. This resulted in a bumpy column where the extra stitch was knit with the last stitch.

There were a couple of other methods that seemed to me similar to these. I stuck with method #2, and my sis was considerate enough to ignore the bumpy column, but I’m still going to figure out sometime how to make the first method work correctly for me.

Before starting with the earflaps, I first confirmed with my sis where she wanted the colorwork column to be positioned. πŸ™‚ After marking out the spots for the flaps, I started out with knitting them, but then decided to crochet instead because I thought they would do well to be thicker.

I then strung yarn into the crochet edges and made 5-strand braids for the ties.

Earflap hat

Both my sis and I love how it’s turned out!

Lacy diamonds top

Remember the Lacy hearts cardigan that I ended up frogging? I used the same base pattern to make a top this time, with the same yarn that I used for the textured shawl that I posted about recently.

Lacy Diamonds Top
I knit two pieces for this top — the front and the back — and used whip stitch to join them. The top is a bit loose at the armholes, but I’m going to do some more sewing to tighten it up. (I’ve gotten a bit lazy and haven’t finished tightening yet.) The hems of this top are garter stitches, with the bottom edge being wider than the rest.

Lacy Diamonds Top
My original design had much shorter lines of diamonds, but I’m glad I decided to make them this long. To remind me of the Lacy hearts cardigan, I also added one single diamond on the back, in between the shoulder blades. I’m so elated that I finished at least one Lacy hearts project! πŸ™‚

Scalene shawl

Yet another post that is delayed due to various reasons, the main one being my laziness. :/ After a bout of creative experimentation for new knitting-related stuff, I’ve just been too bored to follow through on the results. This asymmetric shawl is one of those experiments that was pretty successful as I see it. πŸ™‚

Scalene Shawl
I needed a light shawl for the occasional cool day when a regular shawl would be too unweildy, but not so light that I shiver from the slightest gust. Enter Nako Comfort Stretch sport-weight yarn. Not having worked with elastic / stretchy yarn before, I must admit it was fun getting used to maintaining the correct tension while I knit. Once past that stage, it was a purely pleasant experience working with this yarn. And the results — my stockinette stitches from the yarn are the straightest, cleanest, most beautiful ones I’ve ever made. I’m going to buy more of it soon for a future project!

Scalene Shawl
For this shawl, I’ve used seed stitches for one section, stockinette stitches for another, and an eyelet pattern of my own making for the remaining. For the finishing, I used in-pattern selvedges + garter stitches for two of the edges, and double-crochet along the other. All three edges are of different lengths, and I decided to (unimaginatively) call it the ‘Scalene’ shawl.

And for the first time, I tried the Charting charts that TECHknitter talks about for tracking one’s progress. I’ve never been much into diagrams, and used to make Excel trackers before I saw TECHknitter’s chart-charts; my Excel trackers, it turns out, were too-long versions of chart-charts. I like the alternative, easy-to-track representation provided in chart-charts, especially when it comes to patterns. (And what knitting project doesn’t deal with patterns!) Needless to say, my pattern-heavy projects use chart-charts now!

Diamond Yoke Pullover — done!

It’s done! My simple beginner yoke sweater. Well, it’s been done for a while now, I just hadn’t written about it… Here’s how it looks on me —

Diamond Yoke pullover

A very high-contrast picture indeed! πŸ˜› Regardless of the quality of the picture, I’m happy with how the project itself turned out. I stopped working on the sleeves before they could reach the wrists, so it’s more like a top than a pullover; but hey, I’d had enough of working — twice — with this inflexible (figuratively speaking) yarn so anything that looked decently wearable was good enough for me.

Though I speak as if I would kick this yarn out the first chance I get, it’s really not that bad a yarn if I think about it. (Or maybe I just feel that because everything looks funny, or at least harmless, in hindsight.) So just to prove to myself that the yarn is actually a nice little obedient one, I made an extra something from the leftover. But more on that later. I’ll concentrate on the sweater now.

I really like how the design has turned out. (Probably because it’s my own design, hehe…) Remember how I said in my previous post that I’d started out this pattern as a cable pattern, and decided to make the reverse side as the front? So yeah, I just knit it on the wrong side to keep things simple for myself. So it’s mostly purl stitches in this knit-in-the-round pullover.

Diamond Yoke pullover -- sleeve, hip

I’d originally intended to keep the bottom of the pullover simple and without a pattern, but seeing from experience how this yarn does not show designs very well, it made sense to add a row there. Of course, the sleeves got their due share of the pattern too.

I made the neck wide, and that shaped out well. I finished the piece with garter stitch borders. It’s simple, but I think it’s effective for this piece.

Diamond Yoke pullover -- neck

One would think that the season for sweaters is over, but for people like me going to offices with chameleon-like air-conditioning settings — it’s freezing one day at my workplace and pleasantly cool another — an extra layer (or two) comes in handy. And if there’s one thing I appreciate about this yarn, it’s that it does keep me warm! πŸ™‚

Multi-directional diagonal scarf

Now that I’ve gone back to a day job (bye bye breakie! πŸ˜₯ ), my yarn-time has reduced drastically. So much that I’ve started setting targets — like knitting at least an inch of material every day. And then I fall short of that target most days, either because I’m too tired (or sleepy) or because I have other things to do.

Since the lacy hearts cardigan is crawling along at snail’s pace, I’m showcasing a past project of mine — a multi-directional diagonal scarf.

Multi-directional diagonal scarf

Multi-directional diagonal scarf

See how the self-striping nature of the brown/orange/maroon yarn goes so beautifully well with the perpendicular-triangles pattern! This was one of the few projects that I didn’t want to end! πŸ˜€ But alas, a scarf can only be so long… (This one ended up pretty long, hehe…)

There are plenty of excellent tutorials now (there’s even a free Ravelry pattern) for a multi-directional diagonal scarf. I’d followed the one at Marty’s Fiber Musings, but I must admit I came up with the idea for this pattern before I decided to see if something like that already existed. I’d called it Perpendicular Scarf. πŸ™‚ I hadn’t known about short rows then, and was beginning to get very frustrated trying to figure out if I could get it to work without having to sew up small, independently-knit triangles. I was delighted, ecstatic even, to discover the existence of short rows. They are, I learned then, an integral part of knitting socks. I was not even mildly interested in sock-knitting until then. (Well, I still don’t knit socks. Bangalore has a pretty pleasant weather year-round, so socks get kinda irritating after a while.)

Anyway, back to the scarf. Who knew the simple garter stitch, when coupled with short rows, would turn into such a beautiful-looking scarf! Look how lovely the texture is!

Multi-directional diagonal scarf

I liked it so much that I made another scarf using the same pattern and a different stitch. The result delighted me. I’ll leave it, along with the discoveries I made then, for another post.

Now, will this be your next project? 🐻