Letter holder

Well, it’s been a long time since I did some crochet, and I finally got the opportunity. The table in my room has been collecting old receipts. (I know right, in this age of online everything!) I don’t think I really need them, but I decided to keep them at least until the warranty period of their items expires — warranty periods have gotten shorter anyway. But dusty papers lying forever(ish) on a dusty table? Especially when I need to clear it now and then, at least partially, to make room for my crafty ( πŸ˜‰ ) endeavors? Why not shove them into a letter holder instead?

So I made a letter holder. After all, I had quite some yarn left over from my projects, and what better use for all that yarn, right? Look at it doing its job!

Letter holder

Letter holder

This letter holder was quite easy to make because almost everything in here is double crochet.

I first made the base with some dark brown super-bulky yarn, and this was the quickest part — I was done before I could say “letter holder”. I started bottom up, increasing the number of stitches at both ends in every row as required. I kept crocheting with the same width until the desired height. I then crocheted one single-crochet row around a wooden rod that I added to stabilize the structure. Finally, I decreased stitches on both ends to reach the top. I made a sturdy loop at the top that I would use to hang the piece.

I then made the granny squares independently. Well, mostly independently, because I used the join-as-you-go method to stitch them together while I made them. I always start granny squares with a magic loop, and this was no exception. I first made the larger piece, then made and attached each smaller piece to it. I’d thought I’d go with one more layer of smaller pieces, but decided not to.

Instead, I added three rows of double crochet in different colors around the granny square ensemble. The piece now looked wide enough to fit the base — slightly bigger, actually, so it has some slack to hold the letters and who-kn0ws-what-I’ll-throw-into-it. I used single crochet join to firmly attach three sides of the front piece to the base. Pre-pinning the pieces at regular distances helped me maintain the same gauge throughout, and get a uniform look.

I now felt that the base looked kinda bald, so I used single crochet to add a fine edging around it. πŸ™‚ This turned out to be good in more ways than one, because it made the piece maintain its shape better.

Finally, I cut a few pieces of yarn and added a tassel at the bottom.

Tiny triangles top

Hurrah! The top with triangles is officially done; I just finished weaving in the ends a few days ago. I’d kept thinking of this as my first multicolor project, but I realized when I saw an old, old tote bag that I’d knit — that was my first multicolor, stranded-knitting project. Of course, I didn’t know much about knitting then, let alone stranded knitting, and my now-‘experienced’ eyes see a few mistakes, but it’s still a beautiful bag, and kudos to younger me for experimenting so successfully. πŸ™‚

But I digress. That tote bag deserves a post of its own. (Add to things-to-post-about list — check.) Back to the tiny triangles top. Just in case you’re wondering — it’s the triangles that are tiny, not the top. Here’s a picture to prove that it’s human-sized.

Tiny triangles top

Tiny triangles top

Things looked fine while I knit the front and back pieces. I sewed them together using grafting at the shoulders and mattress stitch at the sides. Then, after repeated failed attempts with different bottom edgings,Β I realized that the edging just won’t sit well with this yarn, even if I made it longer. So I’ve just let the current short 1×1 rib be. It folds up but looks okay(ish), and I can always tuck it in.Β The compromises one makes, huh… And nope, the yarn doesn’t play well with blocking either. πŸ˜€

I still have a lot of the yarn left. I can’t think of any knitting or crochet project I’d want to use it for, since I don’t wear lacy stuff much (nor does my immediate family), and it’s too much work to make a non-lacy project with this thin yarn. So I’m making a different needlework project — a cross stitch one — from it. I still feel bad for the yarn that it’s not gonna turn into a clothing item. Any ideas for a quick-but-not-lacy project?

Striped phone cover

… with flowers!

Striped phone cover

This is a pretty old project of mine —Β  a phone cover made using leftover yarn from other projects. (After all, isn’t that what phone cover projects use — leftover yarn? Mine always have…)

For the body, I knit in the round for the required length, alternating blue and pink rows. At the top, I created holes by repeating *yo, k2tog*, then bound off in the next row. I then sewed up the bottom. For the pull cords, I made two 3-strand braids, each about four times the width of the cover. I looped the cords from opposite ends, weaving them between the yarn-over holes, and finally knotted together the ends of each cord.

The cover still seemed too plain, so I crocheted two flowers that I secured tightly on the cover. Ta da! ❀

Diamond Yoke Pullover — done!

It’s done! My simple beginner yoke sweater. Well, it’s been done for a while now, I just hadn’t written about it… Here’s how it looks on me —

Diamond Yoke pullover

A very high-contrast picture indeed! πŸ˜› Regardless of the quality of the picture, I’m happy with how the project itself turned out. I stopped working on the sleeves before they could reach the wrists, so it’s more like a top than a pullover; but hey, I’d had enough of working — twice — with this inflexible (figuratively speaking) yarn so anything that looked decently wearable was good enough for me.

Though I speak as if I would kick this yarn out the first chance I get, it’s really not that bad a yarn if I think about it. (Or maybe I just feel that because everything looks funny, or at least harmless, in hindsight.) So just to prove to myself that the yarn is actually a nice little obedient one, I made an extra something from the leftover. But more on that later. I’ll concentrate on the sweater now.

I really like how the design has turned out. (Probably because it’s my own design, hehe…) Remember how I said in my previous post that I’d started out this pattern as a cable pattern, and decided to make the reverse side as the front? So yeah, I just knit it on the wrong side to keep things simple for myself. So it’s mostly purl stitches in this knit-in-the-round pullover.

Diamond Yoke pullover -- sleeve, hip

I’d originally intended to keep the bottom of the pullover simple and without a pattern, but seeing from experience how this yarn does not show designs very well, it made sense to add a row there. Of course, the sleeves got their due share of the pattern too.

I made the neck wide, and that shaped out well. I finished the piece with garter stitch borders. It’s simple, but I think it’s effective for this piece.

Diamond Yoke pullover -- neck

One would think that the season for sweaters is over, but for people like me going to offices with chameleon-like air-conditioning settings — it’s freezing one day at my workplace and pleasantly cool another — an extra layer (or two) comes in handy. And if there’s one thing I appreciate about this yarn, it’s that it does keep me warm! πŸ™‚