Cable City!

Finally, finally! My cabled top is ready. 🙂

Cable City! Top

This was the most fun I’ve had with cables till now — never a boring row! I did work on it on and off, though, so that might have been a contributing factor to the not getting bored bit. 😛

The Nako Saten yarn that I used for this was really fun to knit with. (I’ve bought more skeins to knit something for my mom.) And I totally love the color. ❤ It’s too hot right now to wear this top, but fall or winter would be perfect.

I knit everything top-down. I made the front and back separately, sewed them together, then knit seamless set-in sleeves. I lined all the edges with i-cords.

These are the cable patterns that I used for this top:

Cable City! Top

To look up the pattern names, I referred to my old post which I’d written when I’d made just a little bit of progress on this one, and saw that I’d hoped this top would be epic when done. 🙂 I do think it’s turned out pretty epic (it’s my latest favorite project 😀 ), and I can’t wait to wear it when I’m out and about! ❤

Lost

I own this top that has lace for the upper part (neck to chest.) To my horror, even with the gentlest of rinsing, the lace tore at places. I didn’t want to replace it with more lace, and instead, thought I’ll make something of my own.

I went with crochet, and thought of keeping it hole-y (I don’t wanna say lace, because it’s not 😀 ) at the neck and getting more solid as it progresses. This is where I am so far.

Lost with lace

And now, I’m lost. I don’t want to continue with the solid section, because the piece is becoming thicker than I like. To make it thinner, I’ll have to add more airy stitches, and I don’t want that. I’ve also made some bad increases that results in some frills. I don’t feel that keeping on moving ahead will help.

Yup, I’m lost, and I think I’m gonna undo the whole thing and start over. Maybe with knitting this time, so it’s light and yet solid. I really had my heart set on crochet, though. Such a conundrum, isn’t it!

Blood and Ash top

The two-tone top is done! I used up the entire skien of the gray yarn, right down to a tie-cord accessory 😉 at the neck. I still have almost one skein of the red left, though. I’ll have to think of a project for it.

Blood and Ash top

Blood and Ash top

I’d mentioned earlier that I’d made a ribbed raglan for this top, and I continued with stockinette stitches for the body and sleeves. I used tight 1×1 cables for the edgings instead of simple eyelets that I’d thought of before, and it suits the rest of the top, I must say!

Blood and Ash top

I’m happy with the length of the top and the sleeves. (Phew! Glad the gray lasted — in the end, I was knitting from both ends of the skien and alternating between the sleeve rows.) I like the ease in the top as well. The cord at the neck is still too wiggly, but one more stretching treatment will hopefully fix it. The only problem I have is that it’s still super-hot weather here, and I want it to cool down fast so I can wear this one!

Two-tone top

Remember when I talked about my novice self strutting off and buying insufficient amount of yarn for stranded knitting? Yeah, in the same shopping spree, I’d also bought another insufficient set — 3 red and 1 gray skeins of the same yarn that I used for my horizontal cables sweater.

Before I bought the yarn, I’d given some thought to the placement of the stranded knitting areas, but now, I knew that working on stranded knitting would result in a short jacket at most. And the placement I’d thought of won’t do for a short jacket. So instead of stranded knitting, I decided to knit a two-tone raglan top / sweater with the yarn.

Since the top would just be stockinette stitches, I decided to add some ribbing along the raglan shaping, and finish all edges with some simple, discreet eyelets. (Weird combination, I know, but that’s me! 😛 ) This is how the raglan ribbing looks for the red body and gray sleeve —

Blood-and-Ash two tone top

The yarn is worsted weight, which means the progress is so much faster on this! I’m going to name it the Blood and Ash top. 🙂 These colors do make a good combination, don’t they?

Cabled top in progress

I’ve been working on a cabled top for a while, and it’s the other large project I’m working on. (The first one being the do-over pullover.)

Cabled top patterns

This top is heavily cabled, and it’s the first time I’m making something this cable-y. It’s a lot of stitches, and is slow(er) progress because of the amount of stitch twisting involved in each right-side row, but I’m ecstatic about how it’s turning out. The Nako yarn that I’m using settles down well in the stitches, and the cables look presentable as a result. 😀 I’ll use the same pattern for the back of the top as well as the front, and I might add a few cables to the sleeves as well, so I’m hoping it’ll be epic, haha! 😉

I’m using these stitches in this project:

I was constantly switching between this top and the do-over pullover, and now I’m starting on another project — a shawl for my sis — because it’s boring to keep working on only these two. Which one I’ll finish first remains a mystery, even to me…

Autumn leaf top

I’ve always fretted about not being good at coming up with lace patterns. Cables were something that I managed to get better at with practice, and with practice, I managed to turn out good stranded knitting projects too. Lace patterns were somehow, incomprehensibly, not speaking to me at all. Regardless of what I tried, I would come up with something dumb. Most of my learning so far had comprised of eyelets and simple lace patterns. They taught me decreases and yarn-over basics, but they weren’t enough to come up with patterns that bring the lace concepts in my mind to life. I needed more to understand lace at deeper, stare-into-its-soul level. It was when I made the Ashton shawlette for my mom that I came across different lace stitch nuances, and how different stitches work together to give the look one is aiming for.

Yes, yes, I’m getting to the autumn leaf top…

My sister had wanted a loose lace top, and I’d bought some yarn in a color she liked. I decided to put my lace learning to the test, and though I had to experiment quite a bit, I finally managed to come up with a pattern that I’m proud of. Now I’m out of my very own lace box of shame! 😉 (Well, I’m actually a bit scared, wondering if I can ever outdo this one, hehe…)

Autumn leaf top

Autumn leaf top

The pattern has some nice texture to it too, which reminds me of leaves in autumn. (Coincidentally, the yarn is yellow as well! 😛 )

Autumn leaf top

The top is knit top-down in two pieces — front and back, and is exclusively composed of the lace pattern, except near the seams (shoulders and sides.) Seams have a few rows / columns of stockinette stitch to give some stability to the structure of the garment. I’ve used grafting (shoulders) and mattress stitch (sides) for the seaming; the neck, sleeve and bottom is 1×1 ribbing in a larger needle size.

Here’s my sister wearing the top —

Autumn leaf top

This top has given me a firm push into the ‘I should write a pattern’ zone. It’s mind-boggling how much good patterns need to include these days — right from the gauge to schematics with measurements. I mean, if the gauge and the number of rows and stitches are provided, it’s not difficult to figure out how much the piece measures. 🙂 Anyway, that’s for me to figure out when I finish writing the rest of the stuff in the pattern, and I haven’t even started… 😛

Vintage vest

Vintage vest

Vintage vest

Whenever I see this vest, I think it looks like it’s about 50 years too late in the making 🙂 but I love it! It’s something that I started quite a while back, and with leftover yarn from not one, not two, but three projects! 😮 I’m just really happy with how it turned out. 🙂

At first, I’d picked only the pink and brown yarn, and I wanted the patterned part to be all over the vest, but from my swatches, I knew the yarn I had would not be enough for that. So I picked additional leftover yarn, choosing to only use it for the sides. In a moment of recklessness 😛 I started bottom-up though there was the chance that I would run out of yarn before I finish the project… [fingers crossed]

I made the front and back pieces separately, and it was fun moving between four balls of yarn for every row — two for the two sides, and two for the stranded pattern. The pattern itself is pretty simple, as you can see.

That I decided on a closed vest made neck shaping easier. I’m improving with neck shaping, but I’m still not there — there’re always bulges at certain points along the neck no matter how carefully I calculate. Not for garments with a closed front; the necks in these come up pretty nice, regardless of what design I shape them in. When it comes to necks in open fronts that are meant to be buttoned up, though, no amount of modifications to my calculations seems to work… [Scream of fury! Then quite a few slow, deep, calming breaths.]  I’ve to research and think a bit more the next time I decide on an open, to-be-buttoned-up garment, and try to figure out what’s going wrong.

Anyway, after all that silent screaming, I should really finish what I started talking about — the neck shaping was a simple gently curving one, and obviously, was joined by armhole shaping after a few rows. I worked each side with three balls, one for the side and two for the pattern, and made an extra stitch along the neck — I would pick up this stitch later for the ribbing.

The back was a similar affair, with a shaping of the neck in the final few rows.

I joined the two pieces using grafting at the shoulders and mattress stitch at the sides. I experimented with adding sleeves to make it a top, but I didn’t like how it looked. So decided to keep it a vest / sleeveless top, and added ribbing at the neck and armholes.

My sister said that it’ll go well with a white shirt. (Now when I mention this vest to her, I say “the one that goes with a white shirt.”) I must say I like the combination! 🙂

Vintage vest

I still have scraps of yarn left from this project, and they will go into a tiny project, or maybe something with crocheted squares.