The Phoenix (My do-over pullover)

My pullover has risen again from its own ashes, and is now a beautiful sweater that I’m waiting for colder temperatures to wear! I absolutely adore this pullover! ❀

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

Of course, I did wear it to model it… Phew! The weather’s definitely way too hot for all this stuff. (Look at the glare from the sun seeping through the curtains!) I think I was fidgeting and the picture’s a bit blurry, but it’ll have to do.

The Phoenix pullover

So right now, the pullover’s neatly folded up, and is awaiting a ‘proper’ inauguration. Sleep well until winter, my pretty! πŸ™‚ (Did you know that’s called aestivation? The equivalent of hibernation, only, this happens in summer.)

Advertisements

Almost a do-over…

I’m almost done with my do-over pullover. And by that, I mean I only have to block it! (Yay!) Hopefully, this weekend will be it, and I can wear it — and write about it here — proudly. πŸ™‚ Oh wait, it’s already getting hotter, and it’ll be summer soon. πŸ˜€ Well, I’ll get to wear it sometime this year anyway…

Almost a Do-over Pullover!

Almost a Do-over Pullover!

I just love the color of the yarn, and the gently weaving cables. ❀ Though the sleeves don’t show here, they each have one cable column in them. (I’m waiting for the blocking to be done so I can click a good picture with them. Right now, they’re kinda folding in on themselves.) But phew, did it take a long time to get here or what!

I was ready for a reduction in my knitting time this year, because I’ve joined Polymer Clay Adventure 2017 and intend to try my hand at all 24 projects over the year. With my newfound interest in claying, and my excitement to build upon things I learn from the course — and of course, researching techniques and tools, and browsing stores for stuff — I’ve gotten pretty behind in my knitting. :-/ Especially since my yarn projects are mostly big items like sweaters, and tops, and shawls, any progress that I make is not very visible at all.

However, I’ve made a conscious decision to not push myself too hard to devote time to everything. Dialing up my crazy-level might actually be interesting, but I don’t have the time to handle crazier-me just yet. If I spend less time knitting, even if it’s only an hour or two every week, so be it. As long I have fun while I’m on it! πŸ˜‰

Do-over pullover progress

The do-over of the old frogged sweater that I’d talked about earlier is coming along nicely. Like I wanted to, I changed the cable pattern for the new version. I’d used a uniformly twisting basic cable earlier — knit a few rows and then make a 3×3 twist on an RS row. This time I’m using a more slowly twisting cable — in every RS row, twist the same 3 stitches to the right by one stitch until the moved stitches reach the end of the cable column, then rinse and repeat by twisting the 3 leftmost stitches to the right again.

Here’s how one of the sleeves looks —

Do-over pullover

Do-over pullover — slowly twisting cable. The ‘edges’ are purl columns with a decorative seed stitch column amongst them.

Cables in the old one —

Frogged sweater

Frogged sweater — regular cable. (No close-ups because the sweater doesn’t exist anymore!)

I also didn’t turn the pattern around on the other sleeve (I did that in the old one), so the sleeves aren’t mirror images of each other. Over the years, I’ve found that I seem to like cabled sleeves better when both of them have the same pattern.

Tubular bind off

tubular_bindoff

I’d frogged an old sweater so I could remake it into something that I’d like better and wear more. I’ve started working on the new pullover, and this time, I decided to finish the neck first, instead of leaving it till the end like I always do. 1×1 rib seemed like a good match for this pullover, and in continuing my learning process, I decided to try out something new — a tubular bind off.

It took three tries before I considered it good enough. πŸ™‚

At first, I tried TECHknitter’s way — 4 prep rows and then grafting. But it ended up making a very visible band at the upper part of the rib. In hindsight (you’ll see after you read on about all my tries), I think it was because the stitches were large, and as a result, loose.

I then undid the ribbing partially, and tried with only 2 prep rows, like many other tutorials say. This looked better, but the ribbing looked oversized. I realized that it’s been so long since I’ve knit a proper 1×1 ribbing, and have become used to knitting 2×2 or 3×3 ribbing using the same needles that I knit the body with, that I’ve forgotten to reduce the needle size for this ribbing.

This time, obviously, I had to undo the ribbing completely. I then used needles two sizes smaller than the main ones, and picked up more stitches than I had earlier, and finally, the ribbing is more to my liking.

I love the seamless look that tubular cast off gives. ❀ It makes me think of infinity pools. πŸ˜€ With smaller needles, and resulting tighter stitches, I think TECHknitter’s use of 4 prep rows can make it look even better — the slant at the top where I graft the knit and purl rows would be less pronounced then. I’m not gonna rip out the neck any more though, it’s just something that I’ll try next time! It looks good enough for now, right?

As an aside — I do have to admit that I’ve started liking grafting after using it in so many projects! πŸ™‚

I thenSave

An old sweater to the frog pond

First cabled sweater

I think this was my first cabled sweater? I’m not entirely sure if it was the very first, but it was definitely one of the early sweaters I knit — cable or no cable. I’ve ended up unraveling it now. (Gulp!) I know the sweater looks fine at first glance, but it had scarcely been worn due to many small problems.

  • The neck was pretty small. Yes, of course I can fit my head through there, but I better not have combed my hair beforehand, or I’ll end up having to comb the resulting destroyed mess again. And don’t get me started on static hair… πŸ˜‰
  • The stitches were really loose. I knit loosely, and I compensate with smaller needle sizes now, but I didn’t know then. (Do I need to say that I was alien to the concept of swatching as well? πŸ™‚ )
  • The stitches may have been loose, but the sweater itself had negative ease. That’s right, lack of swatching, probably some measurement / stitch-count miscalculations too. And I asked myself every time I wore it — are those stitches or holes! πŸ˜‰
  • Put loose knitting and no tension management together, and boom! We have asymmetrical left- and right-twisting cables.
  • The raglan shaping was not all that great, and it practically had no shoulders at all. I know, it looks okay, but appearances can be very deceiving! (Blame Praise the clothes hanger! πŸ˜‰ )

I kept the sweater around for a long time due to sentimental reasons. In hindsight, it was really not that bad for a beginner sweater (look at that neck shaping!) Like I mentioned earlier, it’s a whole lot of small problems and nothing major. But I didn’t love it when I wore it, and that’s just so unfair to the sweater, right? Right? So…

Rrrrrriippppp!

The yarn has now had a nice soak-and-dry to remove the kinks, and has turned into cozy little balls. I’m happy that it’s still in pretty good condition. I’m gonna knit the same sweater again with it — (cough) maybe with a modification or two (cough) πŸ˜‰ A new and improved Version 2! πŸ˜€

Of course, this’ll happen after I’m done with KG’s sweater, which is still in progress. It’s a lot of knitting. I’m not a super-fast knitter, I don’t get a lot of knitting time, and I usually have more than one WIP going. This time has been an exception. So to break the monotonousness of working on a single project and keep me motivated, I did some pattern searching on Ravelry and started a shawl for my mom so I could improve my understanding of lace. (No pictures clicked yet!) I’m now back on KG’s sweater, and have started knitting the sleeves. We have a long weekend coming up, and it turns out I’m not doing anything big then, so I’ll have more time to knit and hopefully finish KG’s sweater in time for her upcoming vacation. Fingers crossed!

Diamond Yoke Pullover — done!

It’s done! My simple beginner yoke sweater. Well, it’s been done for a while now, I just hadn’t written about it… Here’s how it looks on me —

Diamond Yoke pullover

A very high-contrast picture indeed! πŸ˜› Regardless of the quality of the picture, I’m happy with how the project itself turned out. I stopped working on the sleeves before they could reach the wrists, so it’s more like a top than a pullover; but hey, I’d had enough of working — twice — with this inflexible (figuratively speaking) yarn so anything that looked decently wearable was good enough for me.

Though I speak as if I would kick this yarn out the first chance I get, it’s really not that bad a yarn if I think about it. (Or maybe I just feel that because everything looks funny, or at least harmless, in hindsight.) So just to prove to myself that the yarn is actually a nice little obedient one, I made an extra something from the leftover. But more on that later. I’ll concentrate on the sweater now.

I really like how the design has turned out. (Probably because it’s my own design, hehe…) Remember how I said in my previous post that I’d started out this pattern as a cable pattern, and decided to make the reverse side as the front? So yeah, I just knit it on the wrong side to keep things simple for myself. So it’s mostly purl stitches in this knit-in-the-round pullover.

Diamond Yoke pullover -- sleeve, hip

I’d originally intended to keep the bottom of the pullover simple and without a pattern, but seeing from experience how this yarn does not show designs very well, it made sense to add a row there. Of course, the sleeves got their due share of the pattern too.

I made the neck wide, and that shaped out well. I finished the piece with garter stitch borders. It’s simple, but I think it’s effective for this piece.

Diamond Yoke pullover -- neck

One would think that the season for sweaters is over, but for people like me going to offices with chameleon-like air-conditioning settings — it’s freezing one day at my workplace and pleasantly cool another — an extra layer (or two) comes in handy. And if there’s one thing I appreciate about this yarn, it’s that it does keep me warm! πŸ™‚

Diamond Yoke Pullover

It’s been a while since I posted. I’d not been very satisfied with my ongoing yarn projects, and didn’t have the inclination to blog about past projects. I’d been wanting to make a yoke sweater with the yarn from the recently unraveled lacy hearts cardigan. While I obviously didn’t want to use multiple colors, all good-looking-but-easy patterns I ran into used more than one color. And I wasn’t able to come up with a good pattern on my own. This yarn is a pretty tricky one because simple patterns don’t show much on it.

I finally decided to use a simple cabled pattern, and when I started testing it out, I discovered that it looked better on the reverse side. Well, the inside will have to become the outside then… (I think that can count as a philosophical statement.)

Diamond yoke cardigan - bottomPlease don’t mind the extremely untidy-looking stitches. That is another problem with this denim-based yarn — the stitches just don’t sit well. I’m just hoping that with a lot of eventual wear, they’ll settle down and look fine. (Note to self: Don’t buy denim-based yarns ever again.)

So this pattern is what I’m working with now, and the picture shows the bottom, with a single row of ‘diamonds’. It works well for a yoke if I make a column of diamonds, while changing their size as the yoke comes along. More to come soon.