Waves – WIP

Waves - WIP

I posted this picture a few days ago on my Instagram account, and what can I say, the project still looks mostly the same. After all, it’s a cardigan with a repeating pattern. πŸ˜‰ While I crawl ahead row by row, I’m enjoying working with my handmade stitch markers. πŸ™‚

I’m knitting this sweater for my mom, and have had to rip out a few rows because she changed her mind about how she’d like her cardigan. She’s a dear that way. πŸ™‚ I’ve become quite good at inserting lifelines now, though πŸ˜› so I just added one into an appropriate row, and the undo wasn’t much hassle at all. I’ve already reknit all the rows that I un-knit, and then some.

Now to make some progress for today…

The Phoenix (My do-over pullover)

My pullover has risen again from its own ashes, and is now a beautiful sweater that I’m waiting for colder temperatures to wear! I absolutely adore this pullover! ❀

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

The Phoenix (my do-over pullover)

Of course, I did wear it to model it… Phew! The weather’s definitely way too hot for all this stuff. (Look at the glare from the sun seeping through the curtains!) I think I was fidgeting and the picture’s a bit blurry, but it’ll have to do.

The Phoenix pullover

So right now, the pullover’s neatly folded up, and is awaiting a ‘proper’ inauguration. Sleep well until winter, my pretty! πŸ™‚ (Did you know that’s called aestivation? The equivalent of hibernation, only, this happens in summer.)

Almost a do-over…

I’m almost done with my do-over pullover. And by that, I mean I only have to block it! (Yay!) Hopefully, this weekend will be it, and I can wear it — and write about it here — proudly. πŸ™‚ Oh wait, it’s already getting hotter, and it’ll be summer soon. πŸ˜€ Well, I’ll get to wear it sometime this year anyway…

Almost a Do-over Pullover!

Almost a Do-over Pullover!

I just love the color of the yarn, and the gently weaving cables. ❀ Though the sleeves don’t show here, they each have one cable column in them. (I’m waiting for the blocking to be done so I can click a good picture with them. Right now, they’re kinda folding in on themselves.) But phew, did it take a long time to get here or what!

I was ready for a reduction in my knitting time this year, because I’ve joined Polymer Clay Adventure 2017 and intend to try my hand at all 24 projects over the year. With my newfound interest in claying, and my excitement to build upon things I learn from the course — and of course, researching techniques and tools, and browsing stores for stuff — I’ve gotten pretty behind in my knitting. :-/ Especially since my yarn projects are mostly big items like sweaters, and tops, and shawls, any progress that I make is not very visible at all.

However, I’ve made a conscious decision to not push myself too hard to devote time to everything. Dialing up my crazy-level might actually be interesting, but I don’t have the time to handle crazier-me just yet. If I spend less time knitting, even if it’s only an hour or two every week, so be it. As long I have fun while I’m on it! πŸ˜‰

Blood and Ash top

The two-tone top is done! I used up the entire skien of the gray yarn, right down to a tie-cord accessory πŸ˜‰ at the neck. I still have almost one skein of the red left, though. I’ll have to think of a project for it.

Blood and Ash top

Blood and Ash top

I’d mentioned earlier that I’d made a ribbed raglan for this top, and I continued with stockinette stitches for the body and sleeves. I used tight 1×1 cables for the edgings instead of simple eyelets that I’d thought of before, and it suits the rest of the top, I must say!

Blood and Ash top

I’m happy with the length of the top and the sleeves. (Phew! Glad the gray lasted — in the end, I was knitting from both ends of the skien and alternating between the sleeve rows.) I like the ease in the top as well. The cord at the neck is still too wiggly, but one more stretching treatment will hopefully fix it. The only problem I have is that it’s still super-hot weather here, and I want it to cool down fast so I can wear this one!

Two-tone top

Remember when I talked about my novice self strutting off and buying insufficient amount of yarn for stranded knitting? Yeah, in the same shopping spree, I’d also bought another insufficient set — 3 red and 1 gray skeins of the same yarn that I used for my horizontal cables sweater.

Before I bought the yarn, I’d given some thought to the placement of the stranded knitting areas, but now, I knew that working on stranded knitting would result in a short jacket at most. And the placement I’d thought of won’t do for a short jacket. So instead of stranded knitting, I decided to knit a two-tone raglan top / sweater with the yarn.

Since the top would just be stockinette stitches, I decided to add some ribbing along the raglan shaping, and finish all edges with some simple, discreet eyelets. (Weird combination, I know, but that’s me! πŸ˜› ) This is how the raglan ribbing looks for the red body and gray sleeve —

Blood-and-Ash two tone top

The yarn is worsted weight, which means the progress is so much faster on this! I’m going to name it the Blood and Ash top. πŸ™‚ These colors do make a good combination, don’t they?

Do-over pullover progress

The do-over of the old frogged sweater that I’d talked about earlier is coming along nicely. Like I wanted to, I changed the cable pattern for the new version. I’d used a uniformly twisting basic cable earlier — knit a few rows and then make a 3×3 twist on an RS row. This time I’m using a more slowly twisting cable — in every RS row, twist the same 3 stitches to the right by one stitch until the moved stitches reach the end of the cable column, then rinse and repeat by twisting the 3 leftmost stitches to the right again.

Here’s how one of the sleeves looks —

Do-over pullover

Do-over pullover — slowly twisting cable. The ‘edges’ are purl columns with a decorative seed stitch column amongst them.

Cables in the old one —

Frogged sweater

Frogged sweater — regular cable. (No close-ups because the sweater doesn’t exist anymore!)

I also didn’t turn the pattern around on the other sleeve (I did that in the old one), so the sleeves aren’t mirror images of each other. Over the years, I’ve found that I seem to like cabled sleeves better when both of them have the same pattern.

Tubular bind off

tubular_bindoff

I’d frogged an old sweater so I could remake it into something that I’d like better and wear more. I’ve started working on the new pullover, and this time, I decided to finish the neck first, instead of leaving it till the end like I always do. 1×1 rib seemed like a good match for this pullover, and in continuing my learning process, I decided to try out something new — a tubular bind off.

It took three tries before I considered it good enough. πŸ™‚

At first, I tried TECHknitter’s way — 4 prep rows and then grafting. But it ended up making a very visible band at the upper part of the rib. In hindsight (you’ll see after you read on about all my tries), I think it was because the stitches were large, and as a result, loose.

I then undid the ribbing partially, and tried with only 2 prep rows, like many other tutorials say. This looked better, but the ribbing looked oversized. I realized that it’s been so long since I’ve knit a proper 1×1 ribbing, and have become used to knitting 2×2 or 3×3 ribbing using the same needles that I knit the body with, that I’ve forgotten to reduce the needle size for this ribbing.

This time, obviously, I had to undo the ribbing completely. I then used needles two sizes smaller than the main ones, and picked up more stitches than I had earlier, and finally, the ribbing is more to my liking.

I love the seamless look that tubular cast off gives. ❀ It makes me think of infinity pools. πŸ˜€ With smaller needles, and resulting tighter stitches, I think TECHknitter’s use of 4 prep rows can make it look even better — the slant at the top where I graft the knit and purl rows would be less pronounced then. I’m not gonna rip out the neck any more though, it’s just something that I’ll try next time! It looks good enough for now, right?

As an aside — I do have to admit that I’ve started liking grafting after using it in so many projects! πŸ™‚

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