Eyelet-patterned raglan cardigan

So, my first blog post! Here goes…

I just moved back to Bangalore, and since I’d gone through a period of no-time-for-knitting, I was itching to get something started. I’d carried back a part of my yarn stash with me, so I had the materials ready to make two cardigans — one for my mom, and one for my sister. I’d spent my knitting break period thinking about how I’d like the cardigans to turn out (of course, subject to potential modifications based on preferences of my “customers”. 😉 ) While talking to my sister, she expressed interest in a summer sweater. Perfect for the eyelet patterned raglan cardigan I’d been thinking of!

I was envisioning a simple cardigan with stockinette stitches, with a “sweeping” eyelet pattern in the front. What’s this “sweeping” thing, you ask? The eyelet pattern would encompass a minimal number of stitches at the top, and gradually be worked on more and more stitches, until the patterned stitches increase drastically with a flourish towards the bottom. Kinda (crudely) like the right-front of this cardigan:

idea

Yeah, there you go. My sister liked it (or rather, she didn’t dislike it), so I started diving into the details.

As the sketch shows, the pattern needed to extend in both directions — towards the neck when neck increases are worked, and towards the body according to the “sweeping” (I really should use a different word for this) design.

I decided to use a simple eyelet pattern with 4N stitch-repeat and 8N row-repeat:

  1. * k * [RS]
  2. * p *
  3. * k2, ssk, yo *
  4. * p *
  5. * k *
  6. * p *
  7. * k2tog, yo, k2 *
  8. * p *

But wait, I also wanted the pattern to be symmetrical on the left and right front sides of the cardigan — I wanted the left-leaning and right-leaning decreases beside the eyelets to be reversed. That meant I needed to use the pattern above for only the right-front (say), and reverse the pattern for the left-front:

  1. * k * [RS]
  2. * p *
  3. * yo, k2tog, k2 *
  4. * p *
  5. * k *
  6. * p *
  7. * k2, yo, ssk *
  8. * p *

I thought I would go crazy trying to correctly figure out how to extend this two-fold pattern in two directions as I knit more rows. I did know how many stitches from neck and body in each row are encompassed by the pattern, and I was also going to use markers for those stitch positions, but that definitely didn’t make it any easier on my brain. That is when I decided to write a program that calculates, for a given row, the stitch in left-pattern and the one in right-pattern that forms the first stitch between my pattern-markers. Life suddenly seemed easy! (Do I jot down the program here? That’s a decision I’ve not made yet.)

I’ve been knitting on my merry way the past few days, and the cardigan pattern, with the intended symmetry and the calculated increase points, is coming along nicely.

Progress

More updates in my next post.

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9 thoughts on “Eyelet-patterned raglan cardigan

    • Thank you for the comment and the follow, CrohnieGal, I’m pretty excited about the project as well! You have some great projects going on your blog too — I’ll keep an eye on those! 🙂 And good luck with your treatment.

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      • Thanks very much 🙂 I’m impressed that you are creating your own patterns?! Wow! I’m just novice. Started knitting last year. So much to learn still. But having a lot of fun doing so. I find it very meditative too.

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        • Yes, it’s definitely a stress buster. And I’m no expert in knitting! 🙂 I just find it fulfilling to make my own patterns, even if they don’t turn out great. I started out by coming up with simple patterns for scarves; maybe that’ll work for you too. If you do take the designing route, I wish you the best! It’ll be lots of fun. 🙂

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